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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

4 edition of Antibiotic resistance transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract found in the catalog.

Antibiotic resistance transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract

by Abigail A. Salyers

  • 311 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Springer, R.G. Landes Co. in New York, Austin .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Drug resistance in microorganisms.,
  • Intestines -- Microbiology.,
  • Bacterial genetics.,
  • Genetic transformation.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementAbigail A. Salyers.
    SeriesMolecular biology intelligence unit, Molecular biology intelligence unit (Unnumbered)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQR177 .S25 1995
    The Physical Object
    Pagination191 p. :
    Number of Pages191
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL796666M
    ISBN 101570592977, 3540602054
    LC Control Number95032573

      An important feature contributing to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance is the ability of the resistance genes to move into other bacteria by a variety of genetic means. One transfer mechanism is by plasmids, extrachromosomal elements that can move genes between bacteria of vastly different evolutionary backgrounds, including transfer Cited by: Transfer of antibiotic resistance marker genes in the gastrointestinal tract is particularly relevant to human and animal health 3. Recent research based on non-selective direct visualisation of horizontal gene transfer events suggests that previous methods underestimate the true extent of horizontal gene transfer.

    The effect of oral administration of antibiotics on the intestinal flora of conventional mice and their resistance to colonization by orally introduced Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied. Colonization resistance (CR) was expressed as the log of the oral bacterial dose followed by a persistent take in 50 % of the contaminated by: Enterococci, leading causes of nosocomial bacteremia, surgical wound infection, and urinary tract infection, are becoming resistant to many and sometimes all standard therapies. New rapid surveillance methods are highlighting the importance of examining enterococcal isolates at the species level. Most enterococcal infections are caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which are .

    Human gastrointestinal microbiota, also known as gut flora or gut microbiota, are the microorganisms that live in the digestive tracts of humans. Many non-human animals, including insects, are hosts to numerous microorganisms that reside in the gastrointestinal tract as human gastrointestinal metagenome is the aggregate of all the genomes of gut microbiota. This chapter starts with a brief history of the growing public interest in the ecology of resistance genes and then moves on to a survey of some of the conceptual problems that have emerged. It focuses on a few groups of bacteria that are major players in the oral and intestinal ecosystems of humans and animals, the obligate anaerobes. Perhaps the first modern example of the sudden Cited by: 9.


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Antibiotic resistance transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract by Abigail A. Salyers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Antibiotic Resistance Transfer in the Mammalian Intestinal Tract: Implications for Human Health, Food Safety, and Biotechnology (Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit) Hardcover – January 1, by Abigail A Salyers (Author) › Visit Amazon's Abigail A Salyers Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Author: Abigail A Salyers. Get this from a library. Antibiotic resistance transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract. [Abigail A Salyers]. Buy Antibiotic Resistance Transfer in the Mammalian Intestinal Tract: Implications for Human Health, Food Safety and Biotechnology (Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.

Gene transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract Abigail A. Salyers University of Illinois, Urbana, USA During the past year, new information has appeared about conjugative transposons, a type of broad host-range gene-transfer element that may make an important contribution to gene transfer between bacteria in the mammalian gastrointestinal by: Antibiotic Resistance Transfer in the Mammalian Intestinal Tract (Medical Intelligence Unit) Abigail A.

Salyers. from: $ Thus, the presence of antibiotic residues in the gastrointestinal tract may favor gene transfer from animal to human strains.

Enterococci that harbor antibiotic resistance genes are common in the digestive tract of animals. It has been suggested that these bacteria might serve as a reservoir of resistance genes for human digestive by:   Conjugative transfer of resistance genes from Bacteroides to E.

coli is possible under laboratory conditions [20,21], but, apparently, the conditions in the intestinal tract preclude the efficient mobilization and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes from Bacteroidetes to Enterobacteriaceae.

The bacteroidal β-lactamases are therefore Cited by: Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: Potential spread of antibiotic resistance Available via license: CC BY-NC Content may be subject to copyright. Notably, there have been a few reports of resistance gene transfer in laboratory animals.

For example, transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among enterococci has been demonstrated in germfree rodents. A.A. SalyersGene transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract.

Curr. Opin. Biotechnol., 4 (), pp. Cited by:   Researching the dung of more than pigs and chicken - scientists at Wageningen Bioveterinary Research and Utrecht University certainly aren’t deterred. Along with an international team they published the results of a study into antibiotic resistance in the prestigious journal Nature Microbiology.

The level of antibiotic resistance in the intestinal tracts. Antibiotic resistance transfer in the mammalian intestinal tract: Implications for human health, food safety and biotechnology. Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit.

Austin, TX: R.G. Landes Company. Wegener, H.C. (, May 20). The consequences for food safety of the use of fluoroquinolones in food animals. Goals / Objectives Identify basic mechanisms and selective pressures involved in evolution & transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in enteric nonpathogens & pathogens particularly in relation to cattle and swine.

Analyze, at the molecular level, the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella typhimurium DT and related. Antibiotic Resistance: Fighting a Multi-Headed Demon The direct public health ramifications of antibiotic resistance are truly enormous, with estimated losses in hundreds of millions of lives and trillions of dollars, when accounting for prolonged illness, death, production losses and negative impacts on food security and livelihoods.

Resistance is an ancient phenomenon related to many factors [] including the excessive use of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine [13, 14] and cross-transmission of resistant strains from humans to humans and from animals to humans.A recent study [] identified ESBL-producing strains in up to 80% of retail chicken-meat samples in.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR or AR) is the ability of a microbe to resist the effects of medication that once could successfully treat the microbe.

The term antibiotic resistance (AR or ABR) is a subset of AMR, as it applies only to bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics. Resistant microbes are more difficult to treat, requiring alternative medications or higher doses of antimicrobials.

The first is that the antibiotic resistance feature inherent in marker genes will transfer from GM plants to intestinal bacteria and then onto mammalian cells where expression of novel proteins.

Intracellular bacterial pathogens are hard to treat because of the inability of conventional antimicrobial agents belonging to widely used classes, like aminoglycosides and β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, or macrolides to penetrate, accumulate, or be retained in the mammalian cells. The increasing problem of antibiotic resistance complicates more the treatment of the Cited by: 3.

Gene transfer results in genetic variation in bacteria and is a large problem when it comes to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. Ways for bacteria to share their genes: Conjugation: Two bacteria can pair up and connect through structures in the cell membranes and then transfer DNA from one bacterial cell to another.

We assessed horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During the last decades, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains and treatment failures of bacterial infections have increased the public awareness of antibiotic usage. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics creates a selective pressure on the bacterial flora, thus increasing the emergence of Cited by: Salyers, A.

() Antibiotic Resistance Transfer in the Mammalian Intestinal Tract: Implications for Human Health, Food Safety and Biotechnology, Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit, R. Landes Company, Austin, TX.

Google ScholarAuthor: Gerald W. Tannock. Abigail A. Salyers is the author of Bacterial Pathogenesis ( avg rating, 34 ratings, 3 reviews, published ), Revenge of the Microbes ( avg ra /5.Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to protect themselves against the effects of an antibiotic.

In the presence of the antibiotic, resistant bacteria will survive (or at least multiply faster than susceptible bacteria) and increase in numbers.Antibiotic resistance (AR) which is defined as the ability of an organism to resist the killing effects of an antibiotic to which it was normally susceptible [] and it has become an issue of global interest [].This microbial resistance is not a new phenomenon since all microorganisms have an inherent capacity to resist some antibiotics [].However, the rapid surge in the development and Cited by: